Programming is…

Myth: Programmers get to write code all day.

Truth: Most programmers spend a ton of time (in no particular order):

  • Carefully composing e-mails to other programmers/mailing lists/non-technical folks
  • Sitting in on meetings, working on mockups and DB schemas, worrying about performance implications of proposed features
  • Writing bug reports and searching through bug DBs
  • Scrambling to figure out why systems with numerous opaque layers are failing, digging through multi-GB log files with command line tools
  • Explaining downtime to users/higher ups
  • Contributing solutions to strangers’ problems
  • Reading documentation/books/programming blogs/release notes/vulnerability announcements
  • Searching for existing code that does what you want, maybe without knowing what that’s called
  • Evaluating if code you found solves your problem/would perform acceptably/fits in your environment/has a compatible license/has a lasting support community
  • Installing, configuring, and testing a codebase then finding it won’t work for you
  • Googling error messages
  • Digging through public code repositories to see “how [some open source project] does it”
  • Learning source control tools, bash, GNU utilities, and Linux file permissions (and/or the Windows equivalents)
  • Configuring IDEs, virtual machines, web servers, databases
  • Figuring out how to shoehorn together codebases that weren’t designed to coexist
  • Determining which tasks to prioritize from an endless supply
  • (mrclay)

Do you have any ideas? Let me know if you have.

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